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58真人娱乐平台2020年06月02日21时29分47秒

时间:2020-06-02 21:29:48 作者:前程无忧 浏览量:49442

复制网址领彩金【ag88.shop】Ptyz KDuDa5B9Al\uis/io Sa/m\pa】io Dos Santos i【n Braz/il, Nixo】n Mutis in Colombia】, Ag\udo// Quill【io in the Philip】pines, Rah\】mat Hakimin/ia in Iran.These a【re s【ome of t】he 164 peopl\e /who los/t th/eir lives for d【e\fe\ndi/ng the environ】ment f】ro\m 'menacing industries' in 2018, said a human rights NGO\.That’s【\ mo\re than three people murdered on average ea】\ch 】week, according to a new \repor【t by UK-based Global Witness rele\ased on【 T/uesday.The 】P】h【ilippi/nes had【 the hig\hest number of\/ /kill/ings o\f any count【ry with at leas【t 30 environment d\efe/nders m/\urdered i【n【/ 2018. This is th】e fir【/st time the\ Asian Pac/ific country is at the t\op 】/of\ the lis】/t\ since the NGO reporting such deaths in 2012.Guatemala\ /recor】ded the sharp\e【st ri【se in murders, which【 jumped more than five-fold — m/aking it】 the deadl【/iest 】country pe】r capita.Europe continues to】 be the less af】fected contine\nt with only three \repor【ted deat】hs/, all of them in 】Uk\raine.Increase in killings relat\ed to conflicts over wat\erIn the【 /9 \cou/ntri【es \surveyed, m】ining was linked to 43 】deaths\. Attacks i\n the ag【/ribusiness sect【or were the se/cond cause of d】eat【h (21 \murders). There was a/ four-fold incr/ease in k【illings related to conflicts over/ w\ater/ in 2018 (17/ \murd/ers)/, underli】ning/ the dead\ly cons\eque】nces of warmer tempera/tures, erratic ra】infall【 and【 d/\iminishing groundwater, parti【cularly i】n Latin A】mer/ica, Africa and South】 Asia】, said the report.The a/tt\acks were connected to\ opposition to/ proliferating hydropower projects, as\ well as corruption in the management of local wa/ter 【sources, Alice Harrison, a ca/mpaigner at【【 Global W】itness, told the Th【oms\on Re/ute】rs Foundation."With climate【 b\rea\kdown and in/creasing【 dro/ught, it is【 hi\】ghly likely that \we'll be【gin to see a 【【rise in co】nflicts over water sources involving 】【w【hoever controls them," s/he added【.Duterte'】s reign\ of terrorHarrison poi/nted ou/t that muc【h of t\he persecution of land defenders was driv/en by the 【demand for land a\nd 】raw materials found in everyda【y prod/ucts, "from fo\od to mobile phones, to jewel【le【ry"."This tr【end on\ly/ \looks 】set to wor【sen as strongmen poli【ticians around the w【o【r\ld【 are stripping away environmental and human r/ights protections to pr】o】mo】te busi/nes】s at any cost," 【she said in a stat【ement.N【earl\y 300 farmers, indigenous people and human r/i【g\hts a\ctivists hav【e\ b】【een kill\e【d si【nce Philippine P\resident 】】【Rodrigo Duterte took o】ff/ice in 2016, accor【ding to Philippine human righ\ts group】s.“The Duterte re/gime/'s inte【nsified militarisation of communit/ies has had cata】s【t/rophic effects," said\ Cristina】【 Palabay,【 secr】】【e\tary-general of lan】【d \right\s group\ Kar【apatan."The exp/anded【 power /given to the police】 a/nd 】the m】】【ilitary has \suppr/essed diss【ent and promoted threa/ts, h/arassment and /attacks a/ga\inst acti\vists a/nd】 human rights defende【rs," sh\e said.Intimidat【i】on of environmental defenders on the riseWhi\le there were fewer deaths re】ported than i】n 2017 (207 in /17) Global Wi【tness also reco/rded the i【\ncreasing use of 【lawsuits, a\rrests/, and\ /death threat【s to【 intimid】ate 【ac】tivists 】】even in develo】ped countries.The\ re】port 【takes t/he\ case of Iran where environmental defe/nders are cons【idere【d to be】 te【/rrorist/s \or 【enemies/ of the state, citing t\he case】 of nine \activists i\mpr】isoned on spyi\ng\ cha/rges.Global Witness also note】d the \repression of anti-fracki\ng protests in the UK】\】 by \changing so\me national laws to ban cer\ta\/in demonstrations.The \NGO called out the rol】e of investors — li】ke development 【banks — play in facilitating the violati】on of\ activis\ts' rights to protest.S\ha】re this articleShareTweetSharesendShareTweetShare【send/MoreHide【ShareS】【e/n//dShareShareShareSendShareSh\ar\eYou m\igh/\t also like / 【 \ Watc【\h: Farmers create 【natural straw intend to break plastic�】39;s back \ \ / 【 / 】 EU's youngest com】m【issi\o/ner on how to turn cli/mate crisis around 【 / / / \ 】 】 'Inc【redible win for n】ature】9;: Plans】 to drill in Great/ Australi【an Bight abandoned 】 】 More aboutE/nviro【nme【ntEnvironmental pr】ot\ectionEnvironme】ntal \i/ssues \ \ B【row\se today�/39;s tagsfG9N

OQ4BText sizeAaA【aIt /may be quite some time /until t/he fast-fashion industry c【o/\m/ple【te】ly slow/s 】do/wn, but wit【h new trends\ being set in motion, 【/th/ere is now hope /t】hat 'slow fashi】o】n'】 i\s a【 trend gat/hering trac】tion.T/he demand for 'cool',/ affordable】 clothing/ is h\ard 【to keep up with, with clothes bei】ng/ d【el【】ivered /in bulk i\nt】o highstreet shops\ t\o try 【and match ret/ail expectation/s. But more often than\ not/, they come with a high en】vironment\al pri\ce tag in t/he long term;/ the f/】ashion indus】try\ is the second bigg【est polluter in the 【worl【d, o\nly second to oi/l.A glo【b】al movement called Fashion R】evolut/ion /who are campaign】ing for sustain】a\bility and greater transparency in th\e fashion【 supply chain, have just released their latest report. Known 【】as【 the Fashio\n \Tr\ansparency In】dex, the repo\rt 】scores over 20】0 major【 global【 brands on how su【stainable their manufacturin//g pro/ces/s /is. /As pr】edi】cted, the a\verage score 】is only 21%, indicat】ing that there 【is s\til/l】 a considerable way to go in improving w【or/king c【onditions, hum【an rights and d【ecreasin/g the\ environmental impact of production.\ This rele/ase of /fi】gures c【oincides with the 】s/ixth】 anni/versary of the devastating Rana /】Plaza garment factory collapse 【\in Banglades\h, where /more tha/n /1000\ workers d】ied and aro\und 2,52018 Review:】【】/【 \Singl\e-use p【las【tics to b】e banned in EU we/re injur】ed. The tragic factory disaster was】 the first 】to really t/rig【ger alarm \bells on a g/lo】ba】l scale, rais/ing awareness about the deadly co【st of fast】】 fashion and th】e frankly inhumane working【】 conditions【/ in 【garment factories. \ C\lick on】 th【e video above to see learn mo\/【re abo】ut this report.S【hare this article More from st【yledYLj

YMNEHow to have a fl\ying free holida\y and】 【reconnect wi/th natur】ehsYWCwww

ZHaaOcean【【o】gr\a】phe\r and envir】onmentalist, Jean-Mi】\chel Cousteau, p【a】id/ his f/irst visit to th/e United Arab Emira【tes as 】part of his edu】cation【al conservation programm】e.During hi/s s\tay in the\ emi【rates, Co/ust\eau spoke/ /to more th】an 100 s【ch/oo/l children【 a】b\out the world\&r】squo;s fragile aqu【a【tic ec】osystem.&/ldquo;If you protect the ocean/, y【ou【 】/protec【【t/ yourself,”】 he told the】 you】ng a【udien\ce.】The interactive lear【ning initiativ【e is part of Co】ust\eau’s O【cean Futures Society, which he fo】unded in 1999 with the intention of giving “a voice to the ocean.”Je\a\n-Michel Cousteau teaches【 kids in/ 】th/】e UAE ab【out o】cean c/onse\r【vationABO】UT JEA\N-MICHEL COUSTEAUCoustea】u&rsquo\;s interest in \con】serving t/he \waters of/ the wo】rld b/egan around the ag【e】 of seven when he/ was /t【aken divin】g by his f【a【ther, the re\nowned explorer, fi/lmmaker and scienti】st Jacq【ues-Yve/s】 Couste\au.In /an 】interv【iew【 with Euron【ews, Jean-Michel sai/d that /it/ was his【 family which\ encouraged him\【 to share knowledge 】and start dialogues【 with】 】people to/ spread his ecological 】message.“I【've/ learned a lot of that fro\m my fath\er,&\r【dquo; h\e says.\ &ld/quo;You\ never【, n【ever criticize. Forget about\ that. 【You neve\r【/ point a finger】,】 bec】ause when you point a finger there are th/ree coming back at you.”“You try to have an oppo/r】tunity \to meet and then you ca【n reach each】 o】ther'/s\ h/earts,&rd【【quo; \he added.During h/is long 】career, 81-year-old Cousteau ha\s【 directed more than 80 【films/ and do\c】ume/ntaries, all themed】 on】 sa】fegu【arding the future of t】he planet’s se/as and oc【eans.His current \researc/h e】】xplores how ho//l/i【day resorts】 can minimize thei\/r environmental impact a【nd he recently campaigne/d aga/i【nst the captivi\ty of 100 whales 】\in Russia.Je【an-Michel C】ou/st/eau durin/g inter/view wit/h/ EuronewsWhilst】 plastics are/ a hot topic when i】t com\es t【o/ the 【poll/ution of glob】al ocea】ns, Cousteau is flagging up\ the【 haz】ards of lesser】-know】n】 【wa】】st【e prod\ucts tha】t end up 】in/ our water\wa】ys.】“There are\ hundreds of differen/t/ chemicals,” h\e says/. “\【You take a t】ablet】 of as\pirin and hopefully, it takes care of your headache, [but] where is that chemical going? Righ【t into t】he ocean.&rdquo【;】Cousteau also \highlighted /how p】olluted 】wat\ers had an affect on the human body,\ citing his【 own rece/nt m/edi【\】cal assessment for leve\ls of toxicity.“I was tested with 32 differ】ent t【ypes of chemicals a【nd two types \of heavy 】metal/s,” he revea/led.Jean-Michel Cous/teau /divin\gAs fo/r how to cur【b or elimi\nate dest】ructive environ】ment【/al factors, Co【usteau s/】a\id he bel/ieves that 【better management of natur/al resources【 wa】s 】key.\“/There are hug】e opportunities now to capture all these 】/runo/ffs,&【rdquo; he remarke】d. &\ldquo;And 【we can make】 money doing that because in nature there's n/o was/te, everything is a re【source.”Whils\t s/howing no signs of re/ti【ring】 from his passion of aq】ua】tic conserva【ti】\on, C/o/\uste】/au beli\eves【 that the future of his work is safeg/uarde/d by his son and daughter who are also involve/d\ in the\ 【scientifi\c disci/pline and “heading in the right dir【ection.&rdqu\o;SEEN ON SOCIAL: EXPLOR\ING THE REG\ION’S WATERSEkaterina from 【\Russia 【po【sted a picture of her d/ive to 【a ship wr\eck in Sudan. View 【this post on Inst\agramUnd【erwater SWAT. U【m\bria wreckA post shared by Katerina Kali/nina (@【guzuguzu】) on Mar 8/, /20【17 at 10:57am PST【And Andri\y fro【m U\kraine went\ 】for a dive with】 red fish in Egypt’s Re/d【 Sea\. View this 】post 】on InstagramLifeti】me memories ?&】z】wj;&\#9794;️???A pos/t shared by &\#1040;n【drey Deniskin (@a.\deniskin11) on May 18, 2019 at 8:02am PD】TShare this articleCopy/paste the 【a\rticle video embed l\in/k【 below:CopyShare】Tw】eetSharesen\dShareTweetSharese】ndMore】/\HideShareSendS/h\areShar/eSh】ar【eSend】ShareSh】areYou might also like \ \ Watch: 【Woman set /for epic/】 journey /f/lying migration route 【of endangered【 osprey / 【 / 】 Global energy dem】a】nd deba【/te\/d 】at 【Abu Dhabi Sustainabilit【y Week 】 /】 \ How 】is th【e UAE tackling its food【 waste problem? 】 // More abou\tEnvironmental protectionEcology【Oc【ean【United Arab Emi【rates 【 Browse today's tagsmC9s

sighText sizeAaAaWalking】 along the shore of the Dead Sea give【\【s you a c\lear vision of how 【qui\/ckly【 na/ture \reacts to】 human intervention. The\ Dead S/ea h/as been dying for de\cades,\ and】 the result is \al/ready obv】ious.Nestled betwee】n Israel and the Palestinian T【erritories 】and /Jordan, /the Dead Sea has been le\aving its mark /【【on mankind since biblical times. Famous for its extreme sa】】linity, /an/ Israeli a】r/tist 【has even】 been i【nsp【ired by that and use t/he\ expanse as【 her stu】dio\ to create cry/stal art pi\eces.Since the histori【cal lake has be【en exploited by modern indus】try, the【 wate【r】 】level is【 g】radually lowering. T【he m【iner/al extraction and the diversio\n of the \Riv/er Jord【an&r\s】/quo;s/ water /have been\ big c/ontributors to the phenom】enon.】As the sp\ectacularly shrinki\ng wat\er level leaves it】s mar】k on the shore,\ d\angerous sinkholes appear al【ong the lake - the 】】result of \the br】iny wat/e\r r/ecedin/g unde【rgrou】nd. /In 199【0 th】e】re were a little 】over 100/ sinkholes, accordi\ng to the Geological/ Survey o\f Israel. Today the】re are more t/】h/an【 6,000. This led 【to the n】ecessary clo/【sure【\ of some s【hore seg【ments hence those tourist spots became ghost to】】wns.Click on th】e video above \to learn more ab】out what happens with the Dead/ S】【【ea.Share this【 article 】 More\ from plac/esZAId

84m6For 50 yea\r】s an Israeli【 o【il comp【【any has 】kept bathers 【off a Red Sea bea/ch near】 t/he resort of Eilat bu】t \it co【/uldn’t 】stop sea life from flouri\shing.I【n a wor\ld where co】【r】al r】eefs are s】hrink\ing rapidly, the one \in Eila\t has grown.Due/ to /a lack of human interf】e【rence,】 a spectacular /coral reef blo/】sso】med o】v【er time attracting exotic /fi】sh \and/【 dolphins to th/is 【aquatic paradi\se.The 300-me\tre-long be】ach was handed back to the publi\c a year an/d a half ago after the】 Eilat Ashkelon P【ipeline 】Company (EAPC) 【scaled back it\s operat】io【ns.Now, with access lift【【e/d, int】erest is /mounting 【f\rom scuba divers \an\d tourist】s/ alike w/ho want【 to vi】sit.In response, Israel's Na/ture and Par/ks Authority decided to relocate the cora\ls for their own pr/otecti】on so \the /ind】ustri/al de/bris left /】】by E【APC\ could be removed.S【hare this articleCopy/paste】 t【he article 【video embe】/d link below:CopyShareTweetSharesendS】hareTw】eetSharesendMoreHideShareSendSh【areShare\ShareSendSh/areShareY/ou\ might also 【like 】 '\;Israel is no l/onger a democracy�】9;: Netan\yahu accused of exp【loi】ting coron/avirus to sa/ve career 【 / 】 \】 / / Israel e\】lection: Exit p/olls give Netanyah】u nar\r/ow/ lead / 【 \ \ 】 】 】 / 】 \ \/ / 】 】 Palestinian P\resident Ab】bas cu】ts ties with Israel a】nd US 】over peace plan / More aboutCora/lsIsrael\Envir【onmentEnvironmental protectio【noil 【industry】Touri\sm Browse today's tag】sraly

Wa】t/ch: Iceland's meltin/g \Vatna/jökull Nat\ional Park fights for/ Wor】【ld\ Heritage Statu】s【

skvUImage】s of rubbish piling up in the ocean can be a depressing si/ght. But the good news is that 【ther/e are signs \that cleanup campa/igns are hav\i【ng an 【impact.\At the annual clean u】【p event in Marseille, le】ss a】nd less rubbish is being foun【d. Alain Dumort is head of \t【he Europe】an C】ommission Repres\entative Office in M\a】rseille. A pa\ssionate s】cuba diver, he has joined hundred\s\ 【of voluntee【rs making the plunge in【 muddy Old Por/t waters to 】clean u/p the piles\ of trash \a【ccumulated there over the years.Unli【kel】y as it seems, t/he situation here in M/arseille is imp】r/oving. 【 【 】 \ \ 【 / Alai\n 【/Dum/ort】 / \ 【 / 【 \ 】/ European Commission Representati/v/eMarseille 】 \ “Unl/ikely/ as it s【eems,】 the situation here in Ma】rseille i【s im】prov】ing,” he says. “The type of wast\e has chan/ged o】】ve\r the/ three years that we have bee】n co-organising this cleanup event. Why? Beca/use o】ur partners 【- I won’t name commercial bran【ds - are very consc\ious \o【f the problem. They&rs【q/u\o;ve cut/ do【wn on litter, e】spec\ially singl\e\-use pla/stic【, and/ inst/alle\d mor】e waste bins, so there's l\ess and less r】ubbish of /this【 type.&l【dquo;We see othe【r was】te such a】s buil\】ding-site barriers, bicycles and of cours】e electric scoo【ters, 】bu】t l\e\s/s】 and\ less of those too. And that's a p\【retty good【 】sign. Now the【 goal is to】 shift the emphas】is to rec\【ycling】 and reuse【,/ to deal with all the waste that still\ e/xists — that is the \priority.&rdq\uo;Cleanup operation \is a/ glo\bal moveme】ntThe Vieux-Port Pro\】p【re opera】t/i【on is one of 【over 70 similar events receiving fi】nan/c【ia\l and orga【nisational support of th【e #EUBeachCle】anup campaig\n around the globe.】&ldq】uo;This operation is part of a muc】h broader campaign, 】as we, t】he Euro】pean Commission, work】 at the Europea【n le【vel, but】 we also have a global calling," says D/umor\t./ "That's why this EU 【Bea】ch Cleanup c】ampa】i/gn is carried out tog/ethe】r wit【h the United Na【tions./"“Similar\ ope】rations/ are taking// p【lace i\n many co\un\t\ries around\ the world, an/d in】 par\t\【icula【/r【 throughout the Med】iter/ranean r【egion - in Italy/,】 S/pa\in, Algeri】a, in Morocco, Jordan and so o\n. It's a t/rul【y global o\p【eration, 【because we know full well that waste that comes 【for example from 】Eg【ypt, 【will one day end up in Cypru】s, or in It】aly,/ or【 here\【 in the Old Port of Marseille. So t【he goal of this】 campa】ign is to have a Eur/opean, a M】edite/rra\nean and a \global dimens【io/n【.”Share this articleC【op\y/paste the ar【ticle video embed\ \link below:/CopyShareT【weetSharesendShare【TweetSharese【ndMoreHide/ShareSendSh【areShareShareSendSh】are【ShareMor】/e aboutC\o/ntaminat【ion of 【wa】terEnvironment\al p【ro】tec【tionSea 【 / 】 】 Most view\ed 【 / \ 】 【What influence on climate is 【the coronavirus lock【do/wn re/all【y having?】 \ \ 】 / The new A【I/ system safeg/uar\ding premature babies from i【【nfection】 /【 \ 】 Me\ssenger R】NA/: the molec\ule that may t\each our bodies /to】/ bea】t canc/e\r \ 【 Apple【 and Google say they'll work 【together 】to trace spread of coron/avir\us via sma/rtphones 【 】 Ho】w E】U\ funding is changing the face of Latv】ian innovatio】n 【 】 【 Browse t【oday'】s \tags6Hr6

yr6BMore than 】160 \people kil/led for d】\efendi/ng the environment:【 campai】gn/ groupTfUm

oatnIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gsAcqj

63GNTe/xt si【zeAaAa‘Tis the seas】on to be snowy. Ac【c【ording to\ researc】h by【 Club Med, sustainable, pl\an【t-based 】materials will be the newest trend in\ the\ ski worl/d come 2020.The research emerges as demand for plant-based food i/ncreases year on year, wi\th more c/onsum\ers /choosing ve】getarian and vegan /opti/ons on a weekly basi【s. There has be【en a 39% surge 【in p【lant-based【 eat/ing in Eur/op【e an\d in the】 US,\ /A\m】er】ic】an consumers \purc/has【ed 228 million pla【/nt-【base\d burgers 【between Janu】ary and Ma【y this year.It’s no won】der the【】 ski industry is followi】ng suit, with winter\ hol\iday provider【 Club Me】d stating peop】le want more fro/m their c【lothing and】 an emphasis o【n “ethi】cal ski fa【shio\n.”Accor】ding to \predictions, snow wear will increasingly be made from synthetic a【nd plant-based fa【brics wh】ich are made from soy】beans and/ hemp. /This is/ t\ha\nks to 75% o】f co\nsum【ers wan/ting to m【ake more eco-fri/endly ef【forts to prevent 【c【limate change and more than a third of on\l/ine shoppers \making stricter purchases.Plant-based do【wn/ ski ja】ckets and no\n【-leathe【r boa boots/ are 【f\ore\c/】ast dominate the market/. The jackets will b【e nice and snug\, but cruelty-fr\ee,【 and【 bo/ots wi】ll n\o longer be mad/e using leather. Instead, v\egan alternatives will be on offe/r and 100% GOTS (global o\/\rganic textil】e st/andard) certified organ/ic wool gloves and hats will also be /p\opu\lar.The same study al/so predi\cts tha/t sk\iwear will be revampe】d from a technologica】l perspecti\ve too. We\ will /see the adv/ent【\ of Bluetooth gloves】,/ Ultra HD Smar【【t cameras and ice-repellent snow boots to enhance performance 】in 2020. Overall, skiiers【 are n】ow after better p】erformance, im/proved safety and a sus【tainabilit/y element to \the products 】th/ey are purchasing. Estelle Gi\raudea/u, Manag/ing D/ir】ector UK & 【Northern Europe/ at Club Med said\,&】ldquo;This is /【a/n ex\citi\ng ti\me f/or ski fashi【on. O】【ver the d【\eca///des we have se/e\n clothing】 brands develop exciting new products and wit/h technology advancing】 at suc】h a fast rate, we expect even /more advancements to come.&\rd/quo;T\he【 best eco-friendly skiwear av\ailabl】e no【wEXA Jacket, Pict】u\re Organ【ic Ski\wear, €2【65Picture Organic are a B Corp certified skiwear brand 】with a firm focus on sustainable 】practi】】ce and fabrics. E【ve】ry【 aspect of t【heir /busin【es】s\, from/\ \sou/rce 【m/aterials to \p/ackaging, is tr【anspare/nt and envir\/onmentally-frie/ndly. For ins【tance, they reject the traditional way of /making snow ja【ckets which requi/res pe【trole【um ext\raction. 100% of their prod/uc】ts use【 org/anic, 】rec【ycled an【d bi】o-sourced mater/ials. The EXA jacket is made f【rom 64% r【ecy【cled/】 polyeste】r\ and durable PFC-/free water-repellent treatment, but \does/n't co/mpromi/se on warmth or bre/athabili/ty. These【 de【【sig【ns\ are our f【av】ourite【s. EXA \JacketPi/\cture Organic S】kiwearOpen One 3L Shell Pan\【ts, Openwear, &eu】ro;】329Op\】enwear combi/ne high【 functionality with ethical pr【oduction, /【sus【\tainable\ mat】erials \an】d honesty. Th】e company was f/ounded on the pri【nci】ples of community and t/r【ansparency by Ma【rt\ijn Jeg/erings and /produces stylish, h/ighly f】unctiona【l【 skiwear. Out\erwear is ma/de from eithe\r recy】cled nylon or r】/\ecycled PET bottles】 and \all prod【u】cts bo】ast 20K waterp【roofness. \We love the/se shel/l pants, which come /in four colours.Open One 3L Shell/ PantsOp/enwearMen's\ Pow\der Bo\wl Jacket/,\ Patagonia, €44 (£【;38/0【)Patagonia'\s ski range is world-renow\ned【, offering durable, win\dproof protection and guaranteed warmth. The outdo】or brand has i\mpressi】ve su】stainable】 cred【enti\als, au】diting the/ mater【ials and metho/d/s used,\ taking responsi【【\【bility for the ent/ire life cycle 】of prod\ucts an【d e\xamining h】/ow 【th【ey use resources at our buildings 】an】d facilities.The Pow\d】er 【Bowl Jacke/t is built with /a 100% re\cycled p\ol\【】yeste\】r GORE-TEX face /f【abr【ic a\nd is Fair Trade Certified™ sewn. The questio【n is【, Peppergr【as\s Gre】en or Bal【kan Blue?M】en's 】Powder Bowl JacketPatagoniaS\hare this article\ Mor【e from\】 style3SmL

c7G8Th\e Brief: Greta Thunberg \sets sail acro\ss the \AtlanticpYeE

pBpjEnvironmental】【ists' anger after Hung【ary cuts d【own EU-protected for\es\tGkvV

kFiL【The Green Revol【ution - fast【e【r, cheaper and more eff/icient teles\copic w/indt【urbines 【HzVo

SBcvMussel fa/rms 】fight a\g【ainst【 pollution in \the Baltic; one of the \most polluted seas in the world3oh5

LOeaOne of Greece&rsquo\;s 】【most】 popular tourist d\esti/n\atio/】ns is at risk of ecological and economical disaster as drilling【 companie\s pr\epar】e 】to exploit /thou【sands of kilometres of】 \la/nd, the World Wide Fund for N\atu\re【 (WWF) has】 w】arned.The Gre/ek government has allocated/\ 17/,000 square kilometr【es of Zakynthos to o】il/ c\【ompanies, leadi【ng to activi//sts to 【warn of t【he potential effects drilling fo【r o/il and gas could have.&l/dquo;A】bou】】t a third 【of \】the GDP of the Ionian islands comes from tourism. S】o,【 im/ag【ine t/he scenario【 【of a/ minor】】 or greater【 oil accident and what d【oes that】 mean f【or these is】l/ands】,&rdquo】; said De】】mitres】 Karavellas, t/he\ /direc/\tor-gener/al of WWF Greece.To 【hel】p 【raise awa\reness of the issue, the【 WWF France /sailing boat ‘Bl】ue Panda’ is tra/\vel】ling【/ the Ionian Sea, informing 【islanders at destinations such as Zante, Itha\/ca and K/【e\falonia about the problem.WWF is particularly concerned about the protecti/【on/ of \the loggerhe】ad turtl【e.S/hare this articleCopy/paste the article video embe】\d link below:CopyShar/eTwe【e\tSharesend/ShareTweetSharesendMoreHideShareSen\dShareS】hareShareSe/ndSh/areShareYou mi/g/ht also like/ \ / Europe \acc【used of 'turning a b【li\nd eye' to risk /of corona【virus in migrant camps / 】 Greece use【s】 state TV to\【 teach sc】hool children during coronavi】rus loc/kdown \ \ \ / 【 / Migrants arriving in Greece 】say the】y have no pr\otection again\st coronavirus \ 【 Mo【re aboutGreeceEcologica【l【【 cris/is//WWFEnviron/men【tal prote【ctionNa【tur【al\ 】gasOil 【market Brow\se to/day/'】s tagsMjEc

KUl1Finance going greenf7wq

m5bUAt the s\troke of midnight on Tuesday, Italy said good\bye to c\otton bu】ds, as \the New Year ushe/red】 in 【the country\'s latest push to eliminate single\-use plastic produc】【ts./】Fro/m Ja【nuary 1, it is forbidd/en to/ \pr【\od\uce\ or 】\【sel【l /non-biodegradable or comp\ostable cotton buds.】/ Packaging will also h】ave【 to indicate 【the rule\s/ 【for proper 【di【sposal.Cotton buds account for\ about 9% of waste f【oun/d on 】Italian\ beac\h【e【s】 &/mda/sh; an average of about 60 sticks per beac/h.Italy is the fi【rst European Un【ion country to implement\ s【uch a ban but it won't be the last. In O/ctober, th/e European Parliament voted t\o o【utl】aw most/ si/ngle/-use plastics, start/ing【\ in 20/21.Next New Year's Day, Italy will\ bring i【n【 a\ ban on【 c【o\smetics cont/a【ining microplastics. T【hese are tiny plas【tics g】r】ai\ns found in some exf/oliants and】 detergents 【t\ha】t end \u【p in river】s \and seas, whe】re they are e\aten by fish【 an】d integrated into the【 food chain.Brussels has warned that by 2】050 th】ere wil/l be more 【plastic in th【e /oceans than fish, if nothing is done.Shar\e t/hi/s \articleShareTweetSha【resendShareT\wee【tShar【e【sendMoreHideShareSendSh【areSh\areShareSendShareShareYo/u might a\lso like 【 2/018 Review【: Single-】use plastics to be ban\ned \in EU 【 / 】 【 】 \ QUIZ: So you /think y\ou know about plastic pollution? Test your knowledge now / \ \ / Which Europea【】n countries are th【e \best and worst/ /at r【ec】y\clin\g plastic【 waste/? 】【 【 【 More aboutplasticMicroplasticsEn/vir】onm【【ental protection / Bro】wse tod【\ay's tagsUXiN

8kicIc【eland's lar】gest national p\ark is h】oping to【 /gain UNESCO World\ Herit\age sta】tus at UN committe】e talks in】 Azerbaijan/.Vatnajökull Nati【onal Pa】rk is home to vast glaciers, utterly uni\nh【abit【ed land and ten ac\】tive v\olcanos. Despite the presence of o\p】posing elements/, the great land】scape h\as remained st【ab【l/e【 for/ more than 1,000 years. The meltin【g ice from the /glaciers f【uels some of Iceland'】s most powerful rivers. T】he seasonal ebb 】and flo\w of the ice 】i】s 【crit】ical in mainta/】】ining the/ sta】】bilit\y of the ecosystem of】 /Vatnaj&o】um】】l/;kull\, wh】ich covers 14% of Iceland.Now, however, r/ising temperatures are causing the gl【aciers to melt at unprec/e/d【ented rates. Every/ y\ear, more ice disappears,/ r/evea【ling 】new la\nd underneath the glaciers. In the/ last \century】 alone】, Vatnajök\ull has lost 10% of its volume.The a/re【a is so unlike /anyth】ing else /o\n earth that it has been used as a case study by as/tronauts. In the months pr\eceding the Apollo 11 mission in the late six\ties, Neil Armstrong and his c/olleagues visited the 】park to \study its l】un【ar】-like/ terrain. Som/e a】reas\ of Vatnajökull Nati\onal Park are utterly uninhabited by /lif】e, \be it animal o/r plan\t, render\ing it an ideal】 place to \stud\y moon-like geology.Water, fire /and ice, the elemen/ts that】 make up 【the uniqu\e park【 ar【e represen】ted on t/he nati\onal f\lag of /Ice\la】n【d, blue fo/r water, red for fire, and white】/ for ice. If granted /Wor\ld Heritage Sta【tu】s, Va\tnajöku】ll National Park】 \wil【l b【e the third】 Icelandic site to】 a\chieve the status.Want more【 news?】Video editor • Fr\ancois RazyShare this a【\/rtic】leCopy/pa\ste the 【ar【ticle video emb】ed /link【 bel【ow:CopyShareTweet【S//ha\resen\dShareTweet\SharesendMoreHid【eShar【eSendShareShareShareSe】ndShareShareYou m【ig/ht also l/ike 】 】 / \ 【 / 【 \ \Climate Change top of t\he agen\da as No【rdic mi【niste/rs m/ee】t /Germ/any's Merkel in Iceland 】 【 【 / 【 【【 \ 【\ \Tens of t】housands of Estonian】s perfo/rm mass folk singin【g 】 / \ 】【 Well-being agenda: d/oes this spell/ the e\nd for GDP? \ 】 More abou\t20-seconds【Icel\andEnvironmental protec/tionUNESCO Cultur】a/l 】Heritage ListEnviro/nment / 【 Browse today�【39;s ta】gszq8k

fClRWe /spea】k 】to【 s/oci\al \anthropologist Mathilde Hojr【up】 Autzen abou/t how a Dani/s】h fishing c【ommu/nity】/ is now t【hriving a【fter ne【arly bei\n【g\ wiped out by f/ishing /quotas】.【Share this articleCo】py/paste the article video embed link below:Co\pyShareTw\eetSha【\resendShareT】w】eetS【haresendMoreHideSha【/reSendShar/eShareShareSendShare/ShareYou might also like 【 \ / 【 Depleted fish sto【cks can’t wait. The】 E】U and Norway need to commi【t t【o ending overfishi【ng now ǀ V/ie/w 】 【 】 【 \ Activist/s are rais【in\g funds to sav】e【 Danish wooden boats / / //More aboutF\i/sheryEnvironmen/tal【/【 protectionDenmar/k 】 \ / Most\ viewed 【 \ 】 // 】/ What influence on cl\ima\te 【】is the /c\orona/virus lockdown r/eally having? \ \【 The new AI system safeguard\ing premature babies from i】nfecti\o【n \ 【 【 】 Messenger RNA: the m】olecule that may teach our bodies to beat cancer / 】 \ Apple and Google say they'll wo/rk together to trace sp【read of coronavirus via sm【ar\tphones 【 【 】 】 How EU funding is 【chan】g】ing the f】【ac【e【 of Latvi】an i【nnovation\ 【 】 Browse today's t/agsLQT5

LeWQTe/x【t sizeAaAaA few hundred【 kilo】m【etres 】off the Pacific coast of Ch\ile there is \a 】paradise for div【ers and hikers.The Robin\son \C【rus【oe island i】s one of the three for【】ming the Juan Fern\ande\z archipelago.The islan\d chain secured \its place 】in history as/ the home o】f Alexande【r Selkirk, the\ Scottis】h s\ailor】】 】marooned there for fo/ur years and four mo/nths, a tale he later related t\o Daniel Defoe\,/ who penned his 】adv\enture \book ba】sed\ on his sto【ry.For almost【 a century, the in/habitants of R【obins\o\n Cruso】e ha】ve known that their island's fragile ecosystem depends on them co/nserving its【 unique wildlife, 【s/o they【 decided about /taking step/s a/s ear】ly as 1935.In 1977, the arc/hipel\ago was named a biospher】e reserve and almost a year a【go, Chile announced the creation of the enormous Juan Ferna】ndez Marine Park, one of the largest p【rotected zo【nes i/n th\e Pacific.It al【so co】nnects to【 a network 】of marine reserves in Chile total\/ling some 】【1.】3 【m】illion squa/re /kilometres】【, meaning that about 44 perce】nt of the nation's】 waters ha】ve some lev【el of\ protection against min【】ing and indust【】rial】 fishing."Until 10 years ago, C\hile was one o\f the bi】ggest o】cean exp\】loiters i\n the world, but now i\t ha【s 】changed course】 【and be【【come o】【ne of\ the leaders【 i【n o\cean cons/ervation, /with the creation of/ hug\e marine \parks which \wi\ll】 really help /fish/ s】tocks recover," said Alex \Munoz,【\ Latin Amer】i【ca dir\【ect】or of【 the/ NGO\ Nation】al Geographic Pristine Seas.C】lick 【o/n the 】video above to learn more\ abou】t h】ow these islands preserved 】their fragile ecosyste\m【.S\hare】 thi】s【 article More fro】】m placesCsgO

1.OiJISea chan/ge: how one small str/etch【 of c】o【【as\tline \in Italy transformed it【self \fR5E

2.cEG1Deep sea explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau 【teaches UAE childr\en abou\/t \ocean c/o】nse\rva/tionVoCa

3.RORCSea chan/ge: how one small str/etch【 of c】o【【as\tline \in Italy transformed it【self \FLi0

4.Qfr2M\apping /the 【Arctic\ sea lifeyyrm

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eYxaText 【size/A【aAaYou can d/ocument i】t, just like \ten/s of】 thousands of citizens around t】he worl】d /joi/ned \【\】forc\es for thr】ee d】ays to do so.In 2016【 the Nat\/ural History Museum/ of Lo【s/ Angeles County and California\ Academy of Sci/ence/s started a competition between the tw\o\ citi】es. The g/oal was to in\volve citi\zens in documen\ting nature to hel】p them understa\n】d the urban bi\odiversity】 around them. T\he friendly rival【ry between Los An【geles and San Fran】】cisco enc/ouraged a lot of people to compete and use thei/r c【am【【era and smartphone to\ ma】ke wildlife /obse/rvations.The City Nature Challenge became nationa】l by/ 2017 and internati】onal by 2018. La/st year nearl】y 70 c【ities around the wor【\ld were 【taking part in the com\petiti【on. With 17,000 p】eople partic【ipatin/g, /m/o】re than 441,000】 ob\servations were 】made and 8,600 species were captured. Of these pictured【 spec】ies, 599 of them we/r\/e rare, endangered and th/reatened. Th【/is year】, /the【/ Ci【ty Nature \Challenge got 【more\ than 150 c【ities involved.Click on th】e video above to】 l/earn\/【 more about t/】his year【's chal】lenge and o\ne/【 of the\ cities with the highest contribu\tion.】S】ha/r【e this artic\le】 / M\ore from placesnaae

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Bn5iProtecting life in the Arcti\【c seaso0Mh

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24Q4Ethiopia breaks world \record /by\ plan】ting 350 mil\lion】 trees in one dayVLKv

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MWvS/Join us in t\his i\mmersive 36/0° experience onboard "/B】roodw/inner" - a /29 metre bea/m trawler built// in【 1967 a/nd used to train/ you】ng fisherme【n in Belgium.The vessel, renova【\ted a 【f【ew years ago with the supp】ort of the Euro】pea/n 】Maritime and 【Fis/heries F/und, has everything necessary to p】/rovide fut/ure maritime professiona【l】s\ with ha/】nds-on ex】perience./B】art De Waegenare, a te【acher a\t the Maritie【m Instituut Merca/tor in 【Ostend, \superv\is\es a】 group of l】o\】cal students on/ their training trip."T/he】【y】 come f/rom everywh】】ere in Belgium. /They start at 12-13 years of age, and they sta/y u/ntil 18."The f\irst and the second year clas【ses 【go to】 sea /ev】ery】 \n\ow 【and【 then, but the th】ird and /fourth】 year students go out e/very two week】\/s with t】he vessel — eve【r【y tw【o wee/ks for 【a whole s\chool year."That’s normal\ working hours, between 080/0 and 1600 &m\dash; so/ fo\r 】eight hours a day/, t\hey are at /sea."We /try to t/each them /to be a fis/herma】n — fr】om t\he begi\nning. What is a fis【hing boat, what d】o you/ have to do,/ it’s normal working cond【iti【ons f【/【or a beam trawler【."We teach them t\o work safe\ly】 【— safet\y he】lmet, saf【ety】 device for 】when/ 【they fal】l overboard — that&rsquo】;s never happened, but【 you never know【. So that&r/squo;s also an importan\t part. Working w【ith fish /— 【they have to clean the 【\fish, things 】lik【e that. And /naviga】ting th/e/ vessel also."They really see what it is\, getting their first impression \her\e.\ A/nd then when they get older, they g】et technical cl】a/sses, and t】he older g】u】【\】/ys /\h\ere go to sea on professional fishing vessel\s. There they see real life at a workplace. A】nd that,\ in \my opi\nion\, i\s when they /make/ a choice to do \it — o】r not to d\o it."Journalist name • Denis】 LoctierSh\are this articl【eShareTweetSharesend】/ShareTweetShar【esendMoreHide/ShareSendShareShareSha【reSendSh/areShare\More \aboutOceanFisheryEnvironmental protectionYouth360° vid\eo 】 【 【】 Most viewed / \ /What influence on clim/a【te/ is th\e coronavirus lockdown really having? / 【 / T\【he new AI system 【safeguarding pre/mature babies from infec\tion / \ \ 】 【 / 】 Messenger R\NA:【 \the molecule\ that may teach our bodies to beat cancer 【 】 / Apple and Google\ say they'll wo/rk toget【her t】o trace spread of coronavirus via smartphon】es \ 【 【 】 \ How EU funding is \chan\ging th【e fac【e of L\a/】tvian\ innovat】ion 【 / \ 【 Browse today's t/【ag/sAXnE

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kcztThe Ol\d Port, Mars】eille\’s popular wa】terfro/nt, h\ides a dirty secret.Electric scooter【s, tires a【nd pla】s】tic bottles litter 【【the seafloor.Annual clean-up operationEver【/y 】【ye】ar, volunte/e/rs gat/her/ to clean up some of /the mess. Hundreds of scuba divers collect th/e \rubbish, whic】h is t【h/en【 sor\ted\ an【】d rec\ycled, or otherwise safely dispose/d】 of,【 by 】l】oc\al activists.&ldqu】o;We find a 【lot of【 scooters, ra【i【ling【s, cans, bottle【s,” says Angie Espine【l Caño【n, 】a volun【\t/eer with// Team 13. &ld【quo;The goal【 i【sn&rsqu/o;t just to clean up, it&rs/quo;s also to 】ra】】ise awareness】.&r/dquo;“Last year, we recover【ed 91【m3 /of \waste,” s/ays I\sabelle P/oi】tou/, anoth】er volunt【eer f】】rom the Merterre Associa/tio\n. “The year【 before it】 was 13】1m3, so \that’s a decrease of 40m/3. This/ year, j【udging \from what I c/an s【ee】 and my experience, \I’d say it&rsquo】;s les\s again."We fin】d a lot /of scooters, rail/ings, \cans and bot/tles. The goal isn’t just to clean up, it【’s also to raise awareness. 【 Angie Espinel Cañ/【on / Vo【luntee】r, Team 13 】 With smu\rfs 】for ma】scots, the\ event】 i【s】 a part of the "EU Be】ach Cleanup" campaign -\ h【elping to raise aw//areness of the Europe/an response /to th】e\ marine p】ol【lut/【i【on pro\blem【. One o/f【 the divers is Alai\n Dumor/t — 【the EU’s representa/tive in Mars/eille.“Some 】waste is potentially 】recyclable,&rd/quo; says Dum\ort【. “But 【unfortu\nately 【【not/ sin\【gle-use objects, which go strai\ght in the bi/n. That's why from 2021 the /EU /will 】be banni\】n/g all this kind of single\-use utensils &\mdash; pla】tes, s】tir【rers, cotton bu【ds, /and so on - all the things yo/u fr【】equently find on be】ac】】he\s will be banned.”Mos】t ocean waste co/mes from urban areasAn imp\ortant aspect of the campaign is public outre/ach. Mi】【llions 】of tons of/ waste - mostly coming from u/rban are\a】【s - 】en】d /up in \the ocean 】every/ yea\/r】/.】 It’s been calc\ulated that on every square】 mile /of ocean, thous【ands of piec】es o\f rubbish \are floating./“The fig\ures【 【show that【 80% of marine li\tter originates on land,” ex\pl】ains Olivier Bianchimani/, th】e dir】ector of Septentri\on 】Environneme\nt. “It'【s eithe【r w/ashed away【 by 】/rivers or dis【carded/ d【irectl】y into/ the sea. As you can imagi\ne, it wasn't wind that brough】t r/ailings and bicycles /here.”At \over 【7【0 beach cle】an\up eve【nts organised t\his year b【y the EU a【nd the UN, almost 40 /000\ participants collect\ed ar】ound 】850 ton/s of waste &md\ash; from Camb【/odia to Haiti - and Argenti/】na to】 No【rway.The】 figu/】res show 】\】that 80% of ma/【rin\e litter ori】ginates【 on la/nd. 【 【 【 【Ol【ivier Bianchimani 【 【 Director, Septent】r/ion】 Environnement 【 &ldqu】\o/;This needs to be s/een i/n a【 much broade\r c【ontex】t,&rdq【uo; says Dumort. \&ldqu\o;Ot】herwi【se t\】his would be a loca【l event,【 and you’d be asking \wha\t's】 Europe go【t to do with it. Europe's involved/ precisely because this is a globa】l problem, and 】requi】res a whole s/eries 】o】f a/ct/ions and laws a】t an i】nternational l\/e】v】el.”The Euro/pean Union is\ leading the globa】l 】fight \aga/inst marine li】tter.【 Be//sides its 【policies curbing single-use p\【lastics【 and re/ducing waste from lost fishing gear, the /EU has earmark】/ed\ €350 million for research an【d deve【lopment.Mini-cata】maran scoops】 debris from t\he wa】ter\One/ of the EU-supported tec/hnologies is WasteSha【rk,【 devel【oped in Rotterd】am. A re\motely contr\olled 【m【in\i-catamara】n removes plastics /and othe【r floating deb【ris from【】 the surface of t/he water. Its sen【sors can monito【r pollution levels and \other environmental indi\cator】s. It's electri\call/y powered, emission-\free and ca\n collect hundreds of】 kilos of rubbish/\ at a time.“What we'/re】 trying to do is 】create a \small /enough vessel that will 【get into ti】ght spaces w\here waste col\lect\s, particularly in ha/【rbours and ports, and s/top all【 that waste bei【ng taken out into the greater ocean," says Richard Ha【rdiman, the 【founder on Ranmarine T\echn】ologi/es, the startup behi】nd WasteShark.【The bas】ic function of the WasteShar【/k is very simple. But \ins】ide, it【's a】lways changing &mdash】; 【we【're al【ways trying to make it lighter, mo\re eff/icient/, ea】s\ier to do maintenance on. \ /T】\essa Despinic \ 【 / WasteS【hark】 Design Engineer \ 【 】 / \Ranmarine alrea【d【y has c】us】t\omers in s\everal countries. Enginee【rs ar【e workin\g to make the d\evice\ ful【ly auto\nomous — so it】 can\ c】ollect litter and br\ing 】it back t/o the /recharging station /wi【t【h the need for a pilot.“The】】 basi】c \【【fun【ction】 】of the Wast\eShark is very simple,” says 】d】esi/gn engineer Tess\a Despinic. 】&ldq【uo;It just s】wi】m\s around and collec\t\s【 【tras【h from the su】rface. B【u\/t inside, it's alwa\ys chang/【ing — we're【 \always trying to mak//e it 】\lighter, more effic】ient, easie】r to 】do maintenance\ on. And we're also【 building a\n a【utonomous version t/hat will swim \aroun】d according】 to/ waypo/ints that yo\u give it. So w【e're a\lways wor【king on th】at and】 maki】ng it better.】"I\n the near future\, the de/velop/e】【rs envisage swarms 【of their rob【ots \picking up floa/】ting rubbi/【sh.“I have\ /a】 vision in my hea【【d that keeps m\e】 going,” says Hard/iman. “Tha/t is what we'd be sitt/ing in a\ c\ontrol room an】d from our site, we could see whe】re e/very drone is acros【s th\e planet, how many are【 operating, how 【/much waste is bei\】ng caught — an/d actually see the real impact 】of 】that these things are ma【king around the wor】ld."Technical s【【olutions an】d clean-up campaigns are important. But the simple way】 to keep our se【as】 \hea】lt【hier is to\ drop less litter — a】】nd】 tha【t’s】 a lesson for childre\n and/ adults alike.121212121Share\ t/his articleCopy/past】e the a】rticle v\】id】eo 【embe【d li】nk below:CopyShareT/weetSharesendS/har【/】eTweetSharesendMo/reHideShareSendShareSha/reShareSendShareShareYou migh】t also like \ / 】 Wha/t/’s killing/ ou\r und】erwater ecosystems? / 【 Mor\e 【abo\【utContamination of wate【rEnvironmen\tal prote】ctionSea Most viewe/d 】 \ 】 W\hat influence on \climate is 】the coron/avirus】【 】\lockdown really having? 】 【 【 \ The new AI system saf/egu】/【arding pre/mature /babi】es\ from infect\io\n 】【 Messenger/ RNA: 【the mo/【lecule that may teach our bodies to beat c/ancer 【 】 / \ 【【 【 【 Apple a】】nd Google /say they\'ll wor\k toge\ther to trace spread of cor】onaviru】s vi\【a smartphones / Ho/w EU fundin/g is ch\anging the f/ace of Lat】vian innova/ti/on / Brow【se today's ta/gsxxux

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2BWC“Time is running o/ut”, stres\sed Carolina Schmidt, Chi】l\e’s Environ【men\t and Climate Minister, /in a /】video 【ad\dress before 2019&】rsquo;s Cl】/imate Conference COP25 la\st Decembe【r. &ldqu【o;There can【n【ot be 】an effe/ctive】 global res\ponse/ to clima\te cha\nge withou\t a global response o】n\ ocean/ i/ssues,&rdquo/; she added.】 Ocean issues range widely, fr【om sea【-level rise a\nd lo【ss【【 of 】oxygen, to incr】eas/ed water temperatures and ch【anges thr/ou/ghout e】cosys【te】m【s. The Inte【rgovernmental 】Pane\l 】for /Cl/imate Chan【ge&rsquo/;s (IPCC) sp【ecial report on the s\tate// of the oc】ean\s f/eatures worrying future t\rends, while last 】year\, the heat in the oceans saw the highest value/ /ev】er recorded.Ocean aci】di【f\ica】tion 【u【ndermines the integrity of m【arine ecosystemsOcean a\cidifi【c】atio】n is the phenomenon in wh【ich o/ceans are becoming】 mo/re/ acidic, as they /conti【nu】e to a【bsorb more and 】more of carbo】/n in the atmosphere/, which is【 increasing due \to h】uman-produce】d emissions. In the】 last 200 years, about 30 percent【 of those\ total emissions have\ been gu】lped by\ the ocean, and 】today, sea wat/ers st\ill/ take in a【bout 25【 percent annually.Ocean acidification occurs when seawater rea【cts/ 】w】i【th the CO2 it ab【\sorb【s from t/he 】/atmosphe/【re, prod】ucing// 【more acidity-【inducin】g chemicals while redu【ci/ng important 】minerals - such as calcium c【\arbonate - that marine organisms rely on to /survive】.The oceans’ average s】urface ac/idity, ra【ther stable over millions of years, h\as increased by about 26 percent i】n the last 150 years. “It】 【was a very slow rise unt/il the 1950s, but】 from /then on\wards, acidif】icatio/n gained spee】d,&r】dquo【; sa\ys Dr. J【ean-Pierr/e Gat【/tu\so, researc】\h di】r\ector at the Laboratoire d'Oc&eacut\e;a【n/ographie de Villefranch】\e, CNRS and 【the】 Univ【ersity】】 of Sorbonne. “Since man-m】ade CO2\ emiss【/ions are【 the/ main cause of /\acidification, fut】ure proj】ections depend on their 】levels. In a bus/】【ines】s-】as-usual si】tuation, ocea【n acidification c】ould /i/ncrease by anoth】【er 150 percent by 】2100,” a\dds\/ \Dr. Gattuso.With 9 perc/ent of th】e ne\ar-surface ocean affe】cted by fa】lling p】H, aci\】dification eff】e\cts are incre/asing】ly felt globally,】 across【 a wide range of marine \ec】osystems. “The worl\/d seems to be/ ob【\sessing ab【out what is happening on land【【 and in the atmosphere, no【t realis【ing that li\fe on Ea/rth is wholly a 【s】ubsid】ia/ry of t】/he ocean, that 【a【ccounts for 98 【pe】rcent o/f species on the planet,” says Dr. 】Dan 【Laffoley, M/arine【 Vi/c\/e 【Chair 【on IU【CN&【rsquo;s Wor【ld/ Commission o/n Protecte【d Areas and【 Senior Advisor \Marine Science and Conse\rvation 【for its Global】 Marine and Polar Progr\amme. &ld【quo;What was/ predict\e】d [about acidification] back i\n 2004 as\ something we needed n【ot\ to w\orry abo\u/t until 2050 or 207Deep sea explorer Jean-Michel Cousteau 【teaches UAE childr\en abou\/t \ocean c/o】nse\rva/tion 【is happening now.&rdqu】/o;Cutti/ng /the water&/rsquo;s amount of carbo/nate i【ons】 robs a w【ide range of /mari】ne animals of the vita】l material t/hey n/eed t】o 【build protective shells. Mussels, pla\nkton, or\ reef \c】or】als are /some o】f the main sp\ecie/s u【/nder】 threat, multiple s【tudies show./Tropical 【coral reef\ ecosy】stems oc/cupy less t】han\ 0.1 per【ce/nt\ of the o【cea【n floor, but between on\e and/】 9 millio/n species live in and around them. As scientist/s p/\redict 】that calcium car\bonate 】】will drop by the end of【 t/h/e cen【tury, halv【ing its pre-industria\l con/centration across the tropics, /scientists a】re wo】rried that 【corals m\igh【t switch from building to dissol\vi/ng mode. While they might not shr】ink, oc/ea【n ac】idification a】lone 【might lower 】the densit【y of their s\kel】etons, by as much a\s 20 percent by 20. Aci/dific【ati】on weakens/ reef\s facing furth\er /p\ressures from b\leaching-\inducing heatwaves, \as well as economic act】iv/ities\. “We are/ w\eake】ning their repair mechanisms,&rdquo】; says】 D/r. Laff【ol\】e/y. \In【 the ne/xt 20 years, scientists s\ay that】 coral reefs /are lik【ely to degrade f】ast, chall\/enging the l\ivel/iho\o\ds of 0 million people depending \on th】em for food, coastal prote\ction and income.Acidification al/s【o affects deep-water corals\ – such 【as those in the North Atlantic &ndas】h; whi【ch are biodiversity hotspots, critical hab\itats for thou】sands of species,\ \including commercial ones, s】u\ch as shrimps, lobsters, cr\abs, groupers,/ and snappers. “Their skeletons are being eroded /in】】 the same manner as o\steop】or/os\is is weakeni【ng ou/r b\ones/【,” says Dr. Laffoley.A phe】nom/enon not yet\ \fully under】stoo\d\“There are observations of ho\w ocean acidificat【ion【 im\p/ac/ts certai/n species,\】” says/ Dr【. Helen Fi【/ndlay, biol【ogical o【ceanographer at the【 Plymouth Marine La【boratory (PML),\ which uses Copernicus Climate Cha【nge Servi【ce (C3S) data and 【infras\tru/cture to estim】ate the \ocean\】’s pa/st and fut\ure aci【d【ity. These impacts are m\ore often 【asso\ciated with ocean regions where 【deep waters &ndas】h; which 】naturally t/end to be more acidic &nda/sh; r/is/e to the surfac/e, boosting acidificati【on regionally, explains Dr./ \】F【i/ndlay. For instance, acidic w【at/ers d\ama\ge o【r d】【isso/lve the shells\ of plankt/onic 【sea snails, important feed for fish such as salmon.But /【s\tudies have show\n spec/ies can respond in mixed w】ays. Some might benefit from acidification, as well as f【rom ocean 】warming, and /inc【reasingly p/redate other sp【ecies,\ IP\CC experts cla/im. Across ecosystems, microscopic marine algae – 【or ph\ytoplankt/on, the b/asic feed /o】f many 【marine food webs/ &ndash】;【 【m/ig】\h】t suf\fer or flo】urish in more 【acidic seawater. Satellite 【data on ocean co【l【o】ur from the Copernicus Marine Se【rv【ice can provide【\ a closer look a\t the oc\ea/n&】rsquo;s 】C/O】2 uptake and how the marine food】 chain mig/h\t react.“Th】e Copernicus Cli/ma【te/ /Change (C3S) Marine, Coastal a/n/d Fisher】ies (MCF【) Sectorial Information System (SIS) project has【】 produced\ a series o】f marine envir】o\n】ment clim\/ate imp/\act/ indicators\, including several \re/lev\an【t to ocean ac\idification, a【long with a number of too【ls that demo【nstr/ate how th\e indicators can be used in marine applications,&rdq【uo; 】says Dr. James Clark, s】enior scientist at】 PML/【. “A majo【r goal of the project is /to produce a 【set of products that su\ppo\rt Eu\ropean climate change【【 adaptation str\ategie】s and mitigati【【on policies. Indica【tors from the CS-MCF project are being incorporated in【to the C】3S /C】limate Data【 S】tore, and a】re expected to 】g【o /live in the next few wee】ks.&】r【dq/uo;/Impac\ts on /biod/iversityEffects of the 】same】 phenomenon may take different faces across r【egion【s/. Throu/g【/h the mid-2000s, the U.S.&】r【squo;s Pacific Northwest began seeing dramatic】 oyster d/ie-o/f】fs in【 hatcheri【es, as th【\e larvae were affec】te【d by acid/】ifie【【d waters; the vital 【coastal shellfish/ industry was h/i/t\ 】hard. In Canada, scientists e/xpe】ct acidification\ on the Pacific c【oast to 】/give way to increasingly toxic algae】, compromisi\ng shel【lfish, and a】ffect\ing even fish, seabirds and marin【e mammals. 】They also anticip\ate one species of fish-killing a/lgae might wi/n more territo/ry in mo/re】 acidi\c wate/rs, threatening loc【al salmon aquaculture】.In Eur】ope, big mollusc producers】 on the A【tlantic 】】coasts】/ like Fran/ce, Italy, Spain, and the UK are 】expected t/\o 】suffer the most【 from acid】ifica】tion impacts by the 】end】 of t\he century. Data from \t\he Co【pern/icus Marine Se/\rvice, which recently includ\【ed sea】water】 pH am】【o\ng its】 ocean m/onit/ori\ng indicators】, is/ used】 by res【/ear\chers【 to gain a better under\stan/ding 】of how acidifi】cation evo【lves in 】European waters./Acidification effects in/ the A【r】ctic also worry scientists, some predicting that its \【waters wil\l lose its /shell-building ch\em】\icals by t】he 20/80s. Still, there are o】nly spotty measurements of oce】an【 acidification i】n the A\rctic, points o\ut Dr. Gattuso, due to its hars\】h rese/ar\ch condit/io【ns. \&/ldquo;W\/hat we do know】 is that /Ar【ctic wate/rs are natu\/rall/y mo【re【 a【/cidic – as CO2, li/ke \all gases, dissolves much faster in cold \water. We worry【 that in about 10 percen/t of the\/ A【/rctic’s o/cean s】urface, the 】pH is so low tha/t the \water is b】ecoming corrosive to organisms/ with shells,” says D/r. Gatt\us【o.Changes 【in ocean physics\ and chemistry a\nd impacts o】n organisms and ec/osystem service\】s according to /str/ingent 【(R【CP2.6/)/ an\d/ high bu【sines】s-as-usual 】(RC【/P8.5) CO2 emissions scena】rios.Source: Scie/nce Mag】 “The prob\lem【 is we are really asking for trouble by changing\ t\】he fu】nction\ality of the ocean,&r】dquo; says Dr. Laffoley, who highlights that 【th】e mix of acidificatio\n,\ ocean wa/r/ming an】d lo/ss o】f /oxyge【/n i\n the water】 is weake【ni】ng t【he overall system, with poorly u】nder【sto】od consequences. “The scale and the /amount【 of carbon a\nd h】eat going into the\ ocean is j】ust truly j】aw-dropp/ing. It&rsqu/o;s a\ proble【m that we 【are】 rather storing up than r】esolving it./” Reversing acidif】ication i/mpac/ts on ecosyst/ems?【“We have already\ commit】ted 【to ocea】n a【/c】idif\ication to its current levels and beyond【, through the amounts of】 CO2 emi/\tted,\” says Dr. 】Fin/dl】ay.】 &ldqu】o;T\he onl\y certain approach is mitigatin\g CO2 e【missions,\&rd【qu】o; say】s Dr. Gattuso. “It w\ill take\ a long time to go back to【 the preindustri\al stat/e, but we can /stop oce【an acidification./”Scie【【nce\ i【s exploring solut【【i【ons, but their 【effects on\ e【cosyst\ems and oce\an pr\oce\sses are not yet fully unders\tood. \Some oc\ean-based 【climate change fixes don/&rsq\uo;t t/arget directly oc\ean acidifi【】cation, while】 others might not be very efficient at\ lockin/g away the carbon. However, 【“more researc】h is being done 】to investiga\te ho】w 】we can use macro\algae, sea-grass b】eds, man】gr/oves, et】\c to st【/ore c】arb】on and also to lo【cally/ ease ocea\n acidi【fica/tion,” says Dr. Findlay\.Adapting fisheries to ease t/he pr【e/ssures o/n ecosystems 【may also provide a way to live with ocean acidification. For\ exampl【【e, 】C3S and PML are com\【】bining wh【at mod\el【s/ say abou【t potential ef\fects of 】c】【limate change on Europe/an s【eas with 】speci/es inf\ormation /to f\oresee how fish s/\toc】ks mig】ht /change/ and【/ how ind/【ustri\es and people depending\ on fisheri】es need to ada】pt./ /“The C3S data will】 be/ used to identify /areas of opportunity【, such as】【 increases in number\s of some fish species\, a【s we/ll as risks, such as dec/lining fish stocks\,&\rd】quo; says Dr. Clark.\ &】ldquo;As/ a\ \result, the sector will be able to mitigate the effects of climate change 【by p/lan【ning sustainable fi/shing practices./&/】rd【quo;Identifying which pa/rts o】f the【 oce】an need u【rgent conserv】ation cou\ld】 al【so help ecosystems mit】igate aci【dification. Experts have been map/ping c/ritical marine ecos】ystems to spot\ where protected\ areas should be /created or \exte\n/ded. &l/dquo;We can h/ave /places【 【where we take th】at\ pressure off, so we give/ areas of the oceans the be【st\ h】ope 【of ri\din【\g\ out the cha【llen\ges that they face \while we go ab/out reducing CO2 emissions,” s【ays \D】【r. La\ffoley.Share this /articleShareTw\/ee/tShares\endSha/reTweetShar/esendMore/Hide\ShareSendSh】areShare】ShareSendShareSha/reMo】re aboutGloba】l 【warming and climate\ changeOceanEcosystemEnvironmental prot\ecti/onP\artne【r: Copernicus 【 【\ Most 】viewed \ / / / What】 influence on climat【e// is the coronav\ir\us lockdow\n really havin】g? 】 \ The n\】\ew 【【AI system safeguarding prem】ature\ \ba/bies from infection 【 / 】 / 】 \ Messenger RN【A: the mo【lecule that may teach ou【r bodies to b】eat canc\er \ \A/p【ple and Google say/ they'll 】work tog【ether to t\race spread of coronavirus via smart/p】hones \ 】 【 \ How EU funding is chang【ing \the face o】f Latvian innovation \ Browse toda\y�【39;s/ tagsirXH

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